Reassessing Saussure and Jakobson in the Area of Applied Stylistics

Authors

Keywords:

Literariness, Stylistics, Semiotics, Pedagogy, Prosody

Abstract

There are various branches of literary analysis like hermeneutics, known as the theory of interpretation, concerned with problems of understanding the meaning of the text, or stylistics which helps the reader reveal all the expressive aspects of language like phonology and prosody, morphology, syntax and lexicology. Moreover, some genres of English literature hide meaning in themselves and make it indispensable to have some expert opinion to explain it further. Applying the stylistics approach to literary text teaches the students that the language of literature is an independent kind of discourse, and the writers can use language differently. So when we analyze the literary text based on its language, we also train our students to build their knowledge of different registers- the various ways language is used, the patterns in which particular diction is used etc. Students can also clearly see the registers used in a literary text and easily compare them with the registers of a non-literary text. Keeping in mind the importance of applied stylistics, the present paper explores the pedagogical significance of using stylistics in Indian classrooms. The second part of the paper reassesses the valuable contribution of two great giants of the tradition – Saussure and Jakobson.

References

Endnotes

i. See Bloom, Harold. “The Breaking of Form.” Deconstruction and Criticism,1979, 37.

ii. Upham, Alfred Horatio. “IX. Minor Literary Forms.” The French Influence in English Literature. Columbia University Press, 1908. 403-447.

iii. See Lyly, John. The Complete Works of John Lyly. Vol. 1. Clarendon Press, 1902.

iv. Johnson, Samuel. Preface to Shakespeare. Good Press, 2019.

v. See Noyes, Gertrude E., and De Witt T. Starnes. "The English Dictionary from Cawdrey to Johnson 1604-1755." 1991, 1-433.

vi. See Amarasinghe, Upali. Dryden and Pope in the Early 19th Century. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

vii. Wordsworth, William. Preface to Lyrical Ballads. Rosenkilde and Bagger, 1957.

viii. See Derrida, Jacques. Speech and phenomena and Other Essays on Husserl's Theory of Signs. Northwestern University Press, 1973.

ix. See Jakobson, Roman, and Thomas A. Sebeok. “Closing Statement: Linguistics and Poetics.” Semiotics: An Introductory Anthology (1960): 147-175.

Works Cited

Amarasinghe, Upali. Dryden and Pope in the Early 19th Century. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Bloom, Harold. The Anxiety of Influence: A Theory of Poetry. Oxford University Press, USA, 1997.

Bradford, Richard. Stylistics. Routledge, 2013.

Culler, Jonathan D. Ferdinand de Saussure. Cornell University Press, 1986.

Jakobson, Roman, and Moris Halle. Fundamentals of Language. De Gruyter Mouton, 2020.

Jakobson, Roman, and Thomas A. Sebeok. "Closing Statement: Linguistics and Poetics." Semiotics: An introductory Anthology. Indiana University Press. 1960. 147-175.

---. Language in Literature. Harvard University Press, 1987.

Johnson, Samuel. Preface to Shakespeare. Good Press, 2019.

Lyly, John. The Complete Works of John Lyly. Vol. 1. Clarendon Press, 1902.

Noyes, Gertrude E., and De Witt T. Starnes. The English Dictionary from Cawdrey to Johnson 1604-1755. Oxford University Press, 1991.

Saussure, Ferdinand De, and Roy Harris. Course in General Linguistics (Bloomsbury Revelations). Reprint, Bloomsbury Academic, 2013.

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Published

2022-08-30

How to Cite

Dr Mahesh Sharma. (2022). Reassessing Saussure and Jakobson in the Area of Applied Stylistics. The Creative Launcher, 7(4), 7–16. Retrieved from https://thecreativelauncher.com/index.php/tcl/article/view/991

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Research Articles