Actualizing the Traits of Romanticism in the Poetic Expressions of John Keats

Authors

Keywords:

Portrayal of Nature, Straightforward, Deity, Escapist, Sensuality, Individualism, Romanticism, Mysticism, Hellenism

Abstract

In many ways, John Keats is the most romantic poet ever. Unlike classical poetry, which seeks to portray social experience, romantic poetry focuses on the total expression of the person. Various romantic poets include political or social commentary in their works. But Keats’ poetry is not a means of conveying any prophecy or message. His poetry is for the sake of poetry. There is no moral, political, or social significance to it. Thus, it is the truest poetry. According to Peter, “the addition of strangeness of beauty” is what gives literature its romantic element. Keats is most romantic in his straightforward quest for beauty, in everything else less so. Deity is beauty, and the truth is beauty in his eyes. His faith is beauty; thus, he will always find joy in things of beauty. He fully loses himself and his surroundings in his search for beauty. Romantic poetry describes the world of dreams rather than reality. In a realm of romance and beauty, the romantic poet looks for an escape from the harsh truths of reality. Insofar as he is the most escapist of all the poets, Keats is the most romantic. In his “Ode to a Nightingale”, the poet contrasts his own misery with the delight of the bird. The defining quality of Romantic poets is sensuality. Keats is primarily a sensualist poet.

References

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Published

2022-06-30

How to Cite

Dr. Rituraj Trivedi. (2022). Actualizing the Traits of Romanticism in the Poetic Expressions of John Keats. The Creative Launcher, 7(3), 50–57. Retrieved from https://thecreativelauncher.com/index.php/tcl/article/view/978

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Research Articles