A Comparative Study of Magic Realism in Works of Neil Gaiman and Angela Carter

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.53032/TCL.2021.6.3.18

Keywords:

Magic Realism, Fiction, Juvenile Literature, Supernatural

Abstract

Since the release of Gabriel Garciá Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, Magical Realism has been in favour as a narrative style or genre in adult fiction. The representation of the genre in children’s and juvenile literature, on the other hand, is a recent trend; the components of the genre have been tracked and proven to be genuinely important in the interpretation of current children’s fiction, such as David Almond’s Skelling (1998). The aim of this paper is to look at the elements of magical realism in Neil Gaiman’s Coraline and Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus works in this respect.

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References

Bealer, Tracy L and Rachel Luria. “Traveling with the Gods.” Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild!, edited by Tracy L. Bealer et al., Open Court, 2012.

Carter Angela. Nights at the Circus. Vintage. Random House, 1994.

Gaiman, Neil. Coraline. Bloomsbury, 2013.

Green, Melody. “Ravens, Librarians and Beautiful Ladies: Bhaktinian Dialogism in the Gothic Mythology of Neil Gaiman and George McDonald.” The Mythological Dimensions of Neil Gaiman, edited by Anthony S. Burdge et al., Kitsen Books, 2013.

Hsia, Chen-I. Deconstructing Binary Opposition in Angela Carter’s “Nights at the Circus.” Taiwan: National Chengchi University, 2005.

Porter, Lynnette. “Magic and Dreams and Good Madness”. Preface. The Mythological Dimensions of Neil Gaiman, edited by Anthony S. Burdge et al., Kitsen Books, 2013

Stoddart, Helen. Angela Carter’s “Nights at the Circus”. Routledge, 2007.

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Published

2021-08-30

How to Cite

Mahesh Chandra Tiwari. (2021). A Comparative Study of Magic Realism in Works of Neil Gaiman and Angela Carter. The Creative Launcher, 6(3), 86–91. https://doi.org/10.53032/TCL.2021.6.3.18